Violent crime in Nova Scotia: ‘Four-fold’ rise over two decades

Image copyright Snapchat Image caption Nova Scotia was the deadliest province in Canada in 2010

The rate of killings in Nova Scotia had quadrupled between 1990 and 2010, a study has found.

All 129 people in the province were murdered during the decade, according to research from Statistics Canada, the Canadian public service agency.

That was one of the highest homicide rates in Canada, prompting New Brunswick to pass legislation in 2012 that requires any murder involving a firearm to go through a trial.

The province of Nova Scotia last week introduced a firearms safety bill.

Read more: Canada’s struggling gun control and mass murder record

Data from the agency’s National Housing, Income and Homicide survey suggests suicide was the most common cause of death.

An average of eight homicides were reported in Nova Scotia each year, in every demographic category, Statistics Canada found.

In 2010, it was the first year when homicide rates of anyone over 10 years old matched or surpassed the national average – for the first time since at least 1990.

Average annual rates

20.2/100,000

6.8/100,000

25.3/100,000

64.2/100,000

93.4/100,000

85.9/100,000

142.9/100,000

154.6/100,000

156.7/100,000

184.4/100,000

185.4/100,000

211.7/100,000

268.8/100,000

271.2/100,000

356.7/100,000

360.8/100,000

505.2/100,000

556.2/100,000

598.3/100,000

627.3/100,000

700.9/100,000

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